Brian Moore lost his left arm after he struggled with an intruder in October of 2008 and was shot in the arm. Brian is an airplane mechanic for American Airlines and has a very mechanical mind. Being mechanical himself, Brian uses his know-how to make some minor and major adjustments to his own prosthetic arm to make it “more durable and user friendly,” as Brian says. Brian loves his life, his family, and his job. And he loves tinkering.

Brian Moore lost his left arm after he struggled with an intruder in October of 2008 and was shot in the arm. That’s when Brian became a patient of Baker O&P and started to learn how to handle life a little differently, but just as well.

The first thing you notice when you meet Brian is not his prosthetic arm; it’s his sense of humor. Brian is an airplane mechanic for American Airlines and has a very mechanical mind. Brian makes regular trips to see Gordon at Baker O&P to have adjustments done on his arm and hand, but it’s not just Gordon that tinkers with the arm. Being mechanical himself, Brian uses his know-how to make some minor and major adjustments to his own prosthetic arm to make it “more durable and user friendly,” as Brian says. When Brian found that he didn’t use the elbow spring in his arm, he gutted the applicable parts and made a built-in battery powered elbow release so he wouldn’t have to remove his forearm to “jump” the lock mechanism. Brian said that the battery always seemed to die at the most inconvenient times, so he eliminated that problem. Now he can unlock the dead arm with a simple push of a button on the forearm. Brian also had issues with the durability of the wiring, so (of course) he started making his own wiring harnesses. Brian used a boat restoration project to justify buying an industrial strength sewing machine that he can use to adjust and repair his own harness and save himself a trip to Baker O&P.As a gifted mechanic and avid tinkerer, Brian has created a lot of tools to work on the components of his arm. When he has a need for tools or aids that don’t exist, he welds or attaches things to a fitting to work in the device.

Since he sometimes works in the rain, Brian was worried about his Utah arms getting wet. Gordon gave him an old Utah arm that he gutted with the help of a mill and lathe and made a manual release for the elbow lock. The arm can be safely submerged in water, which is good for an avid fisherman and boater like Brian. This is one of those times when the disclaimer “don’t try this at home” applies.

Brian and his wife enjoy spending time with their granddaughter and new grandson. Brian says that he is still able to do things around the house; it just requires a little more patience. He told his wife that he wasn’t able to do the dishes, at which he reports, “she is still buying it”. He has always been the cook so she’s always done the cleanup. Brian says he’s got it made (or at least he does until she reads this).

Brian loves his life, his family, and his job. And he loves tinkering.

Published by jlbworks